Author Archives: Vanessa

7 Other Sea Creatures to “Question” before Eating

7 Other Sea Creatures to “Question” before Eating

We get pretty revved up around here about asking people to question their shrimp. Today we take a moment to expand our awareness of other seafood that merit the same pause for a variety of reasons. The Statesmen Journal posted an article that lists the top 8 seafood choices (imported shrimp is among them) that consumers should reconsider before eating.

The quick and dirty list is as follows, but I recommend checking out Victor Panichkul’s original article so you can learn how to ask the right questions to arrive at a better option. Once you’re armed with the ‘why’ you can be ready to adapt if the stock becomes restored or the sourcing methods evolve.

  1. Farmed Atlantic Salmon
  2. Imported Shrimp
  3. Imported Basa or Swai, often labeled “Catfish”
  4. Squid (Calamari), imported from India, Thailand, or China
  5. Imported Big Eye Tuna (commonly sold as Ahi)
  6. Atlantic Cod and Pacific Cod imported from Russia or Japan
  7. Blue Crab imported from China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam or the Phillipines
  8. Imported Crawfish

I’ll take the shrimp stir-fry, but can you hold the slavery please?!

I’ll take the shrimp stir-fry, but can you hold the slavery please?!

Last week, the Guardian published a video and article that chronicles the slavery behind sourcing raw material for farmed shrimp feed. 6 months in the making, it explains the hardships endured by migrant workers that are sold to captains of Thai fishing boats. Once enslaved, they do not see land for months or years at a time. They fish for ‘trash’ fish, which are usually the by-catch of a different intended catch like tuna. This ‘trash’ fish is not marketable to global markets in developed countries so it is sent to processing plants to be converted into fish meal and/or fish oil for farming shrimp. Shrimp, by comparison, occupy a huge percentage of the world seafood trade. The U.S. consumes more shrimp than any other country in the world. Even more surprisingly, about 90 percent of the shrimp available in the U.S. is imported, and about half of that is unsustainably farmed (not wild-caught). Continue reading

Countering the Blue Revolution

Countering the Blue Revolution

By Alfredo Quarto, Mangrove Action Project

Introduction:

Today, there is a blue revolution in our midst, driven by immense profit potential, but resulting in furthering terrible environmental losses and human suffering. To counter this “revolution,” a worldwide movement is building against the production and sale of farmed shrimp. Though there are an array of would-be certifiers who claim their particular standard setting process addresses the multitude of problems created by the shrimp aquaculture industry, none of these really suffice in meeting their stated objectives, and so unsustainable shrimp farming continues to expand its destructive course. Continue reading

Global WA Guest Blog Post

Global WA Guest Blog Post

Check out our guest blog post for Global Washington: Contemporary Shrimp 101!

The terms “eat local” and “sustainability” have quickly taken root in American culture. Popular authors and films (think Michael Pollan and Food, Inc.) showcased these two themes to a wide audience, quickly ramping up fervor and action among society. While I cannot deny the effectiveness on illuminating the injustices and lack of traditional farming in the U.S. beef, poultry, and seed patent industries, there has been little explanation about how the seafood industry, especially shrimp production, has adapted to meet increasing demand at low cost.

Continue reading

Internships Available in Seattle, Washington!

The Question Your Shrimp Campaign is taking on Interns for 2014!

Internships are available for students, recent grads, or retired persons interested in increasing consumer awareness about the implications of eating coastal farmed shrimp. The following internships are also available as volunteer positions if you’re short on time but still want to participate. Check them out!

Click on the above internship links to learn about each one and how to apply!